WHO: Boosters are not the right strategy to fight new transmission?

Image Source: © Erdosain | Megapixl.com

Highlights

  • Several countries like Israel are vouching for a third or fourth booster shot. But is it the correct way of dealing with the virus?
  • According to the WHO, a “pan” COVID vaccine is needed to fight the newly emerging variations of the virus.
  • The WHO chief has said that at least 70% of the total world population should be fully vaccinated by the middle of this year. 

As the high rate of Omicron spread is taking shape across counties, several governments are coming with their contingency plans. Understandably, governments and industry leaders are trying to deal with the situation in the best possible way. However, it is significant to look at how the contingency plans are made and how sustainable and reliable they are.

 The policy of multiple boosters

Multiple booster shots seem like the most pragmatic policy to control the transmission of the virus. Several governments have agreed upon the same. The news comes up every other day that another booster shot may help reduce the risk of the virus.

However, it might not be entirely true.

Although a booster shot may help reduce the deadliness of the virus, it won’t assist much in limiting the transmission. Several countries like Israel are vouching for a third or fourth booster shot. But is it the correct way of dealing with the virus? Only time and actions will tell!

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WHO says booster shots are not the optimum way of fighting the transmission of new variants

As countries came up with another booster shot as their contingency plan, the World Health Organization (WHO) said, “a vaccination strategy based on repeated booster doses of the original vaccine composition is unlikely to be appropriate or sustainable.”

To fight back the new transmissions, new vaccines are to be made. That is the only reliable solution. Several agencies are working upon the vaccine dose to fight Omicron and related variants. However, no new vaccine has been produced as of yet. According to the WHO, a “pan” COVID vaccine is needed to fight the newly emerging variations of the virus.

Source:  © Scaliger | Megapixl.com

What are the other significant issues that are needed to be addressed?

Apart from the flaws of the current contingency plan, other significant issues need some limelight on the global level. If humanity wants to combat the coronavirus, then it needs to be united.

There is massive inequality in vaccine distribution. The WHO chief has said that at least 70% of the total world population should be fully vaccinated by the middle of this year. However, currently, the rate is around 50%.

The inequality is such that the rich nations are moving ahead with the third or fourth dose, while millions haven’t even received their first dose of the vaccine. Until the entire population doesn’t get vaccinated equitably, the world can’t win over the virus.

Secondly, according to the European Medicines Agency (EMA), excessive COVID boosters can cause problems with immune response. The drug regulator has mentioned that even if multiple boosters are needed, they should be taken with a sufficient time gap like the annual flu jabs. 

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Bottom line

We are in a critical situation. Countries are moving ahead with the third or fourth dose of the same vaccine, but it might not be a reliable solution. Better research and investment are needed to have a more sustainable and successful plan to combat the virus.


 


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